Learning and Teaching Methodologies Volume 1

Foreword By

Charles A. Shoniregun

Authors:
Jianqin Ma, Vincent Hui, Alvin Huang, Gloria Zhou, Tatiana Estrina, Eleni Makri, James A. Bernauer, Gavin Buxton, Yvette Dentremont, Michelle Voillot, Onesmus Ayaya, Gladys Ingasia Ayaya, Tamara J. Lynn, April Terry, Ziwei Qi, Morgan Steele, Daphney Leann Curry, Emily Kate Reeves, Christina Janise McIntyre, Ioannis Makris

 

Academic contribution is a pride, not only for the Author(s) but for their families, readers, and the research communities, who have learnt to understand the concept in point and disseminate the related knowledge to others without a restriction to a specific learning platform. The impacts of leaning and teaching methodologies are true reflection of what have been taught and how the understanding of the lessons are passed on from one generation to the other. However, the scope of learning is widely seen within the societal interactions as embracement of old and new knowledge. Undoubtedly, our society is upholding to Who, Why, What, When, Where and How leaning and teaching should be at the forefront of the society core value. By all means, learning and teaching must be at the forefront of sustainable learning environment. The latter is unquestionable in order to be inclusively encourage future generations.

£129.00£189.00

£129.00£189.00

Foreword By

Charles A. Shoniregun

Authors:
Jianqin Ma, Vincent Hui, Alvin Huang, Gloria Zhou, Tatiana Estrina, Eleni Makri, James A. Bernauer, Gavin Buxton, Yvette Dentremont, Michelle Voillot, Onesmus Ayaya, Gladys Ingasia Ayaya, Tamara J. Lynn, April Terry, Ziwei Qi, Morgan Steele, Daphney Leann Curry, Emily Kate Reeves, Christina Janise McIntyre, Ioannis Makris

 



£129.00£189.00



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About this book

Learning and teaching methodologies have been the core value of our existence, and the oldest heritage in our quest for civilisation and social understanding of one another in the history of mankind. The dissemination of knowledge can always be traced back to the source of acquisition. The impacts of learning and teaching methodologies are true reflection of what have been taught and how the understanding of the lessons are passed on from one generation to the other. However, the scope of learning is widely seen within the societal interactions and embracement of old and new knowledge. Undoubtedly, our society is upholding to “How did the learner acquire the knowledge?” and “What teaching methodologies were adopted in the process of delivering the contents or information that added value to the learners’ understanding?” By all means, learning and teaching must be sustainable and inclusively encourage future generations.

Table of contents

(9 Chapters)


Chapter 1 (Jianqin Ma)

The Application of Systems Thinking in Tunnel Engineering Course

The Chapter One explores the application of systems thinking in teaching and learning. The is one of the most effective approaches to meet the changing and challenging situation. As a tunnel is built, it is then open to use. In general, as an engineering structure, a tunnel project is considered in terms of requirement, building and operational conditions, cost and time schedule, and risks related to the project. All of these parameters are presented in the content of planning, design, construction, operation, and management stages, which are also corresponding to the execution stages of a new project. The related information, theory, principles and engineering skills are learning and teaching content, as terms, definitions, concepts, case histories and study. In practice, the upgrade and rehabilitation of an existing tunnel are always necessary, since the design life of a tunnel is 50 to 100 years, or even to 120 years, and the technical standards for tunnel operational environments are developing with time.

Chapter 2 (Vincent Hui, Alvin Huang, Gloria Zhou and Tatiana Estrina)

Extended Realities to Extending Realities in Architectural Pedagogy

The Chapter Two presents a case study of the implementation of XRs across the
undergraduate curriculum at Ryerson University’s Department of Architectural Science (DAS) in Toronto, Canada. Three XR technologies: Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR), and Mixed Reality (MR), were adapted into numerous facets of architectural instruction in order to enhance theoretical content, increase accessibility to learning, improve visualization of design work, and heighten student digital savvy. The multitude of techniques and opportunities for implementation are framed within the context of lecture-based instruction, design pedagogy, project feedback delivery, and experiential learning.

Chapter 3 (Eleni Makri)

Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality Serious Games for Teaching Business-Related Higher Education Modules and their Learning Attributes

The Chapter Three is based on the aforementioned reasoning and rationale. And the
chapter aims to discuss in brief augmented reality / virtual reality SGs role for teaching business-associated modules in higher education and their learning attributes, following the structure outline below as next: a) a short introduction of augmented reality / virtual reality technology advancements, b) an illustration of augmented reality / virtual reality technology in higher education, c) SGs for teaching business-related higher education modules and their learning performance and d) a chapter summary regarding SGs current and future research streams for teaching and learning business-associated modules in tertiary education and their prospective learning experience outcomes reported.

Chapter 4 (James A. Bernauer and Gavin Buxton)

A More Accurate View of the Scientific Method in the Physical Sciences and
Implications for Learning and Research in the Social Sciences

The Chapter Four focuses on more accurate view of the scientific method in the physical sciences and implications for learning and research in the social sciences. The Authors perspective of the scientific method and its applicability to the social sciences and how is more in line with the actual practice of scientific inquiry in the physical sciences. Rather than a mechanistic conception of the scientific method, we describe a richer view where creativity and rigor have equal voice. Based on our experiences and perspectives, as teacher-educator and physicist, we think our interpretation of the scientific method more accurately illuminates what research is really about in both the physical sciences and the social sciences. It is therefore the Authors intention to help ameliorate this conflict for the purpose of moving forward with a more creative, integrative, and rigorous template for scholarly inquiry in the social sciences.

Chapter 5 (Michelle Voillot and Yvette d’Entremont)

Culture: Linking Mathematics Pedagogy and the Psychology of Flow

The Chapter Five explores culture – linking mathematics pedagogy and the psychology of flow. Mathematics that is interesting and motivating can lead students to a flow like state. The flow experience is multifaceted. It is a cognitively demanding process that must also take into account motivational and emotional components. With flow theory, students can experience the satisfaction of learning something new. Teachers play a crucial role in helping students learn and value mathematics. Mathematics is more than a set of predetermined procedures resulting in right or wrong answers. To illustrate the relationship between flow, culture, and mathematics pedagogy, this chapter presents the applications of flow in mathematics education, discuss the importance of including cultural representations in the mathematics classroom and propose the quilting – an activity rooted in culture, is a great example of a flowinducing approach to learning mathematics.

Chapter 6 (Onesmus Ayaya and Gladys Ingasia Ayaya)

Using Self-Grading Mechanisms to Improve the Cognitive Performance of First Year Online Accounting Students

The Chapter Six explores and documents the course instructor’s and students’ journey of transition from contact-based teaching and learning to a new culture of remote teaching and learning. The course facilitator and learners used the Blackboard as the learning management system. Blackboard was the university’s preferred mode of delivery. The course facilitator used the student self-grading mechanisms to enhance their cognitive functioning leading to improved performance. How can transitioning to online teaching and learning of an accounting module for first-year students at a rural university be improved?’ Answers to this question were researched, considering teaching, and learning practice options that made virtual teaching and learning a meaningful educational intervention beyond the COVID-19 lockdown period, of which student self-graded assessment exercises were a major finding.

Chapter 7 (Tamara J. Lynn, April Terry, Ziwei Qi and Morgan Steele)

Learning By Doing – Engaging Students in a Culture of Experiential-Learning in A Criminal Justice Program

The Chapter Seven focuses on learning by doing – engaging students in a culture of experiential-learning in a criminal justice program. Experiential-learning, including opportunities for guided reflection, is a valuable pedagogical approach to make education meaningful, relevant to a student’s future career goals, and a tool for changing society and communities. Students involved in experiential-learning activities have a plethora of positive experiences and outcomes including increased academic learning and a reduction of stereotypical attitudes. For criminal justice students, the desire to broaden their worldview, and their place in it, is central to experiential-learning involvement. It is very important to incorporate experiential-learning into teaching research methods, encouraging students to engage in problem-solving, and promoting activism.

Chapter 8 (Daphney L. Curry, Emily K. Reeves and Christina J. McIntyre)

Teaching Strategic Reading Skills after the Lockdown: Ten Principles

The Chapter Eight takes a close look at ten strategies that may support teacher efforts in developing strategic readers after lockdown. After the pandemic, students and teachers alike have struggled to regain a sense of equilibrium and students have experienced varying levels of success not being in a traditional face-to-face school setting. Transitioning back to the classroom after being in a virtual environment for so long has been difficult for all involved. The following strategies will help teachers help students develop much needed skills to improve their reading: Have a game plan, start early, use direct instruction, have students practice often, give proper support, give students ownership to have buy-in, teach self assessment and metacognitive strategies, attribute success to controllable factors, gradually release responsibility.

Chapter 9 (Ioannis Makris)

Differentiated Didactic Approach To Teaching The Arts (D.D.A.T.A.)

Finally, the Chapter Nine presents pedagogical and psychological folds using Differentiated Didactic Approach to Teaching the Arts (D.D.A.T.A.) to improve the life of special needs learners by means of culture, self-knowledge, self-actualization, and the sense of belonging. The D.D.A.T.A. is a relatively new teaching approach in the field of Special Education, developed during the period 2012 to 2020. One of its main goals is to help Special Education professionals to teach persons with Intellectual Developmental Disorders (IDD) or Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) music, dance, and drama, thus cultivating their cognitive, emotional, mobility, expression, communication, social, and artistic skills. Its second key goal is to help teachers form art ensembles comprised solely of special needs individuals which, in turn, could work in harmony with ordinary art ensembles. The D.D.A.T.A. model provides individualized programs adjusted to each special needs person’s abilities; and creates the right, positive psychology and motives for all participants.

Books for you

Bibliographic information

Book Title

Learning and Teaching Methodologies

Edition Number

Volume 1

Publisher

Infonomics Society

Foreword By

Charles A. Shoniregun

Copyright

2022

Copyright Holder

Infonomics Society

Authors

Jianqin Ma, Vincent Hui, Alvin Huang, Gloria Zhou, Tatiana Estrina, Eleni Makri, James A. Bernauer, Gavin Buxton, Yvette Dentremont, Michelle Voillot, Onesmus Ayaya, Gladys Ingasia Ayaya, Tamara J. Lynn, April Terry, Ziwei Qi, Morgan Steele, Daphney Leann Curry, Emily Kate Reeves, Christina Janise McIntyre, Ioannis Makris

e-ISBN 978-1-913572-20-4

ISSN

ISBN 978-1-913572-38-9 (Softcover)

ISBN 978-1-913572-10-5 (Hardcover)

DOI 10.20533/978-1-913572-20-4

Number of Pages

i – xix, 171

Topics

Learning, Teaching, Methodologies, Teaching Strategies

Additional information

Book Type

eBook, Softcover Book, Hardcover Book

Preview

An extra ordinary combination of unique Chapters in learning and teaching. Highly recommended to trainers, researchers, teachers and lecturers from further and higher education, and professional audience.
– Jimmy Golden (Oxford, UK) 10 August 2022.

This book is a source of skill acquisition for trainers, researchers, teachers and lecturers.
– Thomas Wilson (Toronto, Canada) 30 August 2022.

This book is very intense with examples and actual case studies. It draws the reader to explore the next chapter contribution.
– Alison Right (Texas, USA) 8 September 2022.

Review

Return Policy

This item is non-returnable, but if the item arrives damaged or defective, a replacement will be send to you. Please send an email to defectivebook@infonomics-society.org

Content missing

Learning and teaching methodologies have been the core value of our existence, and the oldest heritage in our quest for civilisation and social understanding of one another in the history of mankind. The dissemination of knowledge can always be traced back to the source of acquisition. The impacts of learning and teaching methodologies are true reflection of what have been taught and how the understanding of the lessons are passed on from one generation to the other. However, the scope of learning is widely seen within the societal interactions and embracement of old and new knowledge. Undoubtedly, our society is upholding to “How did the learner acquire the knowledge?” and “What teaching methodologies were adopted in the process of delivering the contents or information that added value to the learners’ understanding?” By all means, learning and teaching must be sustainable and inclusively encourage future generations.

Table of contents

(9 Chapters)


Chapter 1 (Jianqin Ma)

The Application of Systems Thinking in Tunnel Engineering Course

The Chapter One explores the application of systems thinking in teaching and learning. The is one of the most effective approaches to meet the changing and challenging situation. As a tunnel is built, it is then open to use. In general, as an engineering structure, a tunnel project is considered in terms of requirement, building and operational conditions, cost and time schedule, and risks related to the project. All of these parameters are presented in the content of planning, design, construction, operation, and management stages, which are also corresponding to the execution stages of a new project. The related information, theory, principles and engineering skills are learning and teaching content, as terms, definitions, concepts, case histories and study. In practice, the upgrade and rehabilitation of an existing tunnel are always necessary, since the design life of a tunnel is 50 to 100 years, or even to 120 years, and the technical standards for tunnel operational environments are developing with time.

Chapter 2 (Vincent Hui, Alvin Huang, Gloria Zhou and Tatiana Estrina)

Extended Realities to Extending Realities in Architectural Pedagogy

The Chapter Two presents a case study of the implementation of XRs across the
undergraduate curriculum at Ryerson University’s Department of Architectural Science (DAS) in Toronto, Canada. Three XR technologies: Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR), and Mixed Reality (MR), were adapted into numerous facets of architectural instruction in order to enhance theoretical content, increase accessibility to learning, improve visualization of design work, and heighten student digital savvy. The multitude of techniques and opportunities for implementation are framed within the context of lecture-based instruction, design pedagogy, project feedback delivery, and experiential learning.

Chapter 3 (Eleni Makri)

Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality Serious Games for Teaching Business-Related Higher Education Modules and their Learning Attributes

The Chapter Three is based on the aforementioned reasoning and rationale. And the
chapter aims to discuss in brief augmented reality / virtual reality SGs role for teaching business-associated modules in higher education and their learning attributes, following the structure outline below as next: a) a short introduction of augmented reality / virtual reality technology advancements, b) an illustration of augmented reality / virtual reality technology in higher education, c) SGs for teaching business-related higher education modules and their learning performance and d) a chapter summary regarding SGs current and future research streams for teaching and learning business-associated modules in tertiary education and their prospective learning experience outcomes reported.

Chapter 4 (James A. Bernauer and Gavin Buxton)

A More Accurate View of the Scientific Method in the Physical Sciences and
Implications for Learning and Research in the Social Sciences

The Chapter Four focuses on more accurate view of the scientific method in the physical sciences and implications for learning and research in the social sciences. The Authors perspective of the scientific method and its applicability to the social sciences and how is more in line with the actual practice of scientific inquiry in the physical sciences. Rather than a mechanistic conception of the scientific method, we describe a richer view where creativity and rigor have equal voice. Based on our experiences and perspectives, as teacher-educator and physicist, we think our interpretation of the scientific method more accurately illuminates what research is really about in both the physical sciences and the social sciences. It is therefore the Authors intention to help ameliorate this conflict for the purpose of moving forward with a more creative, integrative, and rigorous template for scholarly inquiry in the social sciences.

Chapter 5 (Michelle Voillot and Yvette d’Entremont)

Culture: Linking Mathematics Pedagogy and the Psychology of Flow

The Chapter Five explores culture – linking mathematics pedagogy and the psychology of flow. Mathematics that is interesting and motivating can lead students to a flow like state. The flow experience is multifaceted. It is a cognitively demanding process that must also take into account motivational and emotional components. With flow theory, students can experience the satisfaction of learning something new. Teachers play a crucial role in helping students learn and value mathematics. Mathematics is more than a set of predetermined procedures resulting in right or wrong answers. To illustrate the relationship between flow, culture, and mathematics pedagogy, this chapter presents the applications of flow in mathematics education, discuss the importance of including cultural representations in the mathematics classroom and propose the quilting – an activity rooted in culture, is a great example of a flowinducing approach to learning mathematics.

Chapter 6 (Onesmus Ayaya and Gladys Ingasia Ayaya)

Using Self-Grading Mechanisms to Improve the Cognitive Performance of First Year Online Accounting Students

The Chapter Six explores and documents the course instructor’s and students’ journey of transition from contact-based teaching and learning to a new culture of remote teaching and learning. The course facilitator and learners used the Blackboard as the learning management system. Blackboard was the university’s preferred mode of delivery. The course facilitator used the student self-grading mechanisms to enhance their cognitive functioning leading to improved performance. How can transitioning to online teaching and learning of an accounting module for first-year students at a rural university be improved?’ Answers to this question were researched, considering teaching, and learning practice options that made virtual teaching and learning a meaningful educational intervention beyond the COVID-19 lockdown period, of which student self-graded assessment exercises were a major finding.

Chapter 7 (Tamara J. Lynn, April Terry, Ziwei Qi and Morgan Steele)

Learning By Doing – Engaging Students in a Culture of Experiential-Learning in A Criminal Justice Program

The Chapter Seven focuses on learning by doing – engaging students in a culture of experiential-learning in a criminal justice program. Experiential-learning, including opportunities for guided reflection, is a valuable pedagogical approach to make education meaningful, relevant to a student’s future career goals, and a tool for changing society and communities. Students involved in experiential-learning activities have a plethora of positive experiences and outcomes including increased academic learning and a reduction of stereotypical attitudes. For criminal justice students, the desire to broaden their worldview, and their place in it, is central to experiential-learning involvement. It is very important to incorporate experiential-learning into teaching research methods, encouraging students to engage in problem-solving, and promoting activism.

Chapter 8 (Daphney L. Curry, Emily K. Reeves and Christina J. McIntyre)

Teaching Strategic Reading Skills after the Lockdown: Ten Principles

The Chapter Eight takes a close look at ten strategies that may support teacher efforts in developing strategic readers after lockdown. After the pandemic, students and teachers alike have struggled to regain a sense of equilibrium and students have experienced varying levels of success not being in a traditional face-to-face school setting. Transitioning back to the classroom after being in a virtual environment for so long has been difficult for all involved. The following strategies will help teachers help students develop much needed skills to improve their reading: Have a game plan, start early, use direct instruction, have students practice often, give proper support, give students ownership to have buy-in, teach self assessment and metacognitive strategies, attribute success to controllable factors, gradually release responsibility.

Chapter 9 (Ioannis Makris)

Differentiated Didactic Approach To Teaching The Arts (D.D.A.T.A.)

Finally, the Chapter Nine presents pedagogical and psychological folds using Differentiated Didactic Approach to Teaching the Arts (D.D.A.T.A.) to improve the life of special needs learners by means of culture, self-knowledge, self-actualization, and the sense of belonging. The D.D.A.T.A. is a relatively new teaching approach in the field of Special Education, developed during the period 2012 to 2020. One of its main goals is to help Special Education professionals to teach persons with Intellectual Developmental Disorders (IDD) or Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) music, dance, and drama, thus cultivating their cognitive, emotional, mobility, expression, communication, social, and artistic skills. Its second key goal is to help teachers form art ensembles comprised solely of special needs individuals which, in turn, could work in harmony with ordinary art ensembles. The D.D.A.T.A. model provides individualized programs adjusted to each special needs person’s abilities; and creates the right, positive psychology and motives for all participants.

Books for you

Bibliographic information

Book Title

Learning and Teaching Methodologies

Edition Number

Volume 1

Publisher

Infonomics Society

Foreword By

Charles A. Shoniregun

Copyright

2022

Copyright Holder

Infonomics Society

Authors

Jianqin Ma, Vincent Hui, Alvin Huang, Gloria Zhou, Tatiana Estrina, Eleni Makri, James A. Bernauer, Gavin Buxton, Yvette Dentremont, Michelle Voillot, Onesmus Ayaya, Gladys Ingasia Ayaya, Tamara J. Lynn, April Terry, Ziwei Qi, Morgan Steele, Daphney Leann Curry, Emily Kate Reeves, Christina Janise McIntyre, Ioannis Makris

e-ISBN 978-1-913572-20-4

ISSN

ISBN 978-1-913572-38-9 (Softcover)

ISBN 978-1-913572-10-5 (Hardcover)

DOI 10.20533/978-1-913572-20-4

Number of Pages

i – xix, 171

Topics

Learning, Teaching, Methodologies, Teaching Strategies

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